A Guide to Atlantic City Hotels

Atlantic City hotels range from the most expensive five- or five-plus-star hotels to mid-range two- or three-star hotels. Examples of stunning architecture, these hotels form some of the notable attractions in the city.

Located along the coastal strip of the city, beachside hotels that offer thrilling water sports and fun-filled beach activities are perfect options for holidaymakers. The hotels in downtown Atlantic City that are close to the city’s major attractions are classic favorites. Many hotels are available near the famous Atlantic City Boardwalk/Pier. Some of the old hotels, which have been surviving throughout the history of Atlantic City, are now renovated into casino hotels. These are definitely the best choice for gamblers. Moreover, a good number of luxurious business-class hotels are available near the Atlantic City International Airport.

Bally’s Atlantic City, Trump Taj Mahal Atlantic City Hotel & Casino, Sheraton Atlantic City Convention Center Hotel, Sands Casino Hotel, Holiday Inn Boardwalk, Hilton Casino Hotel, and Howard Johnson Hotel are some of the premier hotels in the city.

Atlantic City Hotels offers good quality accommodation in their tastefully appointed rooms and suites. Some hotels also provide extended-stay options. For convenience, entertainment and recreation options and meeting and convention facilities are included. The restaurants at these hotels serve delicious cuisines.

Atlantic City hotels assist guests in planning events and meetings. They also organize day tours, sightseeing, and cruises. In addition to these services, some hotels in Atlantic City offer complementary limousine service.

Atlantic City hotels must be reserved prior to arrival, in order to get need-specific rooms. Reservations can be made online or by phone. Most of the hotels stop accepting reservations one to three days before check-in time. Check-in and check-out time varies from hotel to hotel. Atlantic City hotels can also be reserved through tour operators or travel agents.

Atlantic City hotel rates generally range between $30 and $200 per night. Special discounts are available during off-season. Some hotels offer group and association discounts, whereas others give special low rates for corporate and government employees.

3 Key Reasons Why Your Small Business Blog Will Fail (And How To Make It Succeed Instead)

Whether you are blogging already to promote your small business or thinking of starting a blog, using a blog to promote your small business is not enough in itself.

You may be considering blogging, or have been an owner of a blog for some while now, believing that this blog will bring you more customers. That’s what you were led to believe by all the hype around blogging, and possibly by your tech people too, right?

If this is you then you are not alone. Many small business owners believe, either because of hype, or from seeing competitors take up blogging, that a blog is the key to attracting more customers. In times of recession and downturn any thing that can bring in money to your business is good right?

Wrong.

Starting a business blog can be the worst path you will take in your business. Why? Because many times over small business owners believe that their blog will promote their business.

If this is you, thinking this way will lead you to 3 key reasons why your blog will fail before it gets started.

Key Reason 1: Not understanding the fundamental principle of what blogging is really all about.

Many small business blogs bore people (especially potential customers) with dry sales-speak such as how competitive their prices are. They use their blog to sell first and foremost. This is a BIG mistake.

What To Do Instead:

Stay away from dry sales-speak. Instead entertain and support. Use your blog to offer information that improves, saves and supports potential customers in finding solutions to their wants.

Key Reason 2: Believing that the most important task of your blog is to promote your business first and last.

This mistake leads many small business owners scratching their heads, and disappointed that no one has arrived to spend money in their business. For example, a florist may think that their blog should promote what their florist’s business does – sell flowers in beautiful ways.

What To Do Instead:

Concentrate first and foremost on becoming an advisor. This means actively stepping out of the role of sales person, and stepping into the roles of counselor, expert and leader offering interesting, useful, helpful and entertaining information that improves, saves and supports potential customers.

People are attracted by people who give them short cuts to what they want most. Become that person and people will flock to you – and your business.

Key Reason 3: They pay a lot of money to have their blog designed for them and allow these designers to design a blog that they (the designers) think is “cool”.

Cool is fine – if it sells. Trouble is most of what passes for Cool for other people, usually does not fit your potential customers’ idea of cool. Sure they may think “Wow!” when they see your super-duper blog design (possibly) but will they be persuaded to buy from you because of it? 97% of the time the answer is “No.”

What To Do Instead:

First establish your target niche. Once you have established who you want as customers, you are ready to establish what goals your blog will achieve for you.

Only when you have establish these two fundamental facts are you ready (and able) to decide what kind of blog is best for your particular business to enable you to achieve your goals. It is then that you are in a position to discuss and decide the best design for your blog. Anything that detracts, or leads away, from achieving your goals must be rejected.

Nothing must get in the way of you giving your target niche of people what they want. Establish who your target niche is. If you are a florist remember your target niche is not “people who buy flowers”. Your target niche comes from those people. But you need to hone in on who, what, when, why, how and where among people who buy flowers are your target niche.

When you have established this by answering those six vital honing-in questions, you will be able to establish the target niche – and aim – of your blog. For example, you may have established that: out of people who buy flowers in your area, your target niche are women entrepreneurs between 30 and 40 years old, who want to have beautiful flowers, not only brighten their homes, but their work places too. But they don’t want to bother with arranging bouquets themselves. Oh yes, and they’re Fung Shui addicts too.

There’s your blog’s target niche and aim: Inspiring, saving and advising these women entrepreneurs on how to best use flowers in partnership with Fung Shui principles in order to enjoy increased flows of positive energy.

The Bottom Line:

Blogging can bring increased numbers of people to your business and increase your bottom line – if you understand how to avoid the 3 key reasons business blogs fail and instead make your blog successful.

5 Common Small Business Mistakes (And How To Avoid Them)

1. Technology: Everyone in small businesses understands the need for technology but don’t truly understand what really makes it valuable to your business. Valuable technology has really only two purposes: to make you money and to save you money, period. Although that sounds rather generic, the truth is technology’s primary function is recording data; therefore, the data your systems are using should increase client retention or decrease the time spent on your staff or product fulfillment. Finally, don’t undervalue your technology; don’t pinch pennies here because the right technology is the foundation of your business.

Essentials for technology:
A. Website for lead generation
B. Contact management system for recording clients’ sales history
C. Secured network for growth, sharing, and remote employees (sales team)
D. Technical consultant for helping you determine the best and most cost-effective software and hardware for your company
E. Powerful e-mail marketing system
F. Good accounting software

2. Marketing: Many small businesses don’t think much of marketing until their sales are slumping or they are not generating enough customers (or enough revenue). To compensate for this error, we begin panic promotions, which usually will not lead to greater sales or more clients.

Essentials for marketing:
A. Marketing is essential for business growth and should be implemented before the doors open and continue throughout the business life cycle.
B. Marketing and sales are not the same thing (marketing generates sales leads).
C. Develop a marketing plan and stick to it for a minimum of 90 days.
D. Review and refine your marketing plan consistently; what works for the grand opening may not work next year.
E. Develop a marketing budget and stick to it; marketing is a business cost and should be treated as importantly as your rent (if not more so).
F. Remember “If you open, they will come” is a myth; only marketing will get clients to your business.

3. Know or learn your customers (market research): In my opinion, it is better to know who your customer is before you open the doors, but for the young entrepreneur, this is seldom the case. The good news is if you have done steps 1 and 2, this step will be a little easier because you will have the data to help you see who your true customer is.

Essentials for market research:
A. Know what your best and worst selling items are.
B. Determine the clients’ gender, race, and socioeconomic status.
C. Send out surveys (including some form of incentive).
D. Determine the clients’ buying patterns (every month, week, or year).
E. Include new information in the marketing plan.

4. DIY (do it yourself): Of the entire group of successful entrepreneurs I have met, they all had one thing in common: they did what they were good at and delegated the rest. We all have strengths and weaknesses; as a small business owner, you don’t have the time to correct your weaknesses, so focus on making them irrelevant to your success instead.

Essentials for business management:
A. Delegate effectively.
B. Use technology.
C. Prioritize your strengths.
D. Delegate all weaknesses.
E. Use outside talent when necessary.
F. Hire based on the company’s weaknesses.

5. Being too nice: Most small business owners develop a peculiar bond with their employees and a fear of their clients, which develops to this unique situation. The employees tend to feel that they can do what they want in the company as opposed to what they are told; your business is not a democracy. As for the client side, many new small business owners are afraid to charge what they should or believe they should be cheaper than the competition; nothing could be further from the truth. You charge what your value proposition supports, period.

Essentials for employee and client relations:
Employees
A. Hire slow; fire fast.
B. Business is not a democracy (you are king/queen).
C. Personal feelings have no place in business.
D. Hire to fill a company void.
E. Develop an employee handbook.

Clients
A. Prices are not negotiable.
B. Friends and family are still clients (if they are friends, they would understand that this is your livelihood).
C. You can’t be “all things to all people.”
D. Don’t be afraid to say no.
E. Apologize as well as stand your ground when necessary.

Best wishes,
Darrin Jackson