The Fish We Cook, Atlantic Salmon, Chum Salmon

SALMON, ATLANTIC

The Atlantic salmon can be found on the east and west coast and in freshwater lakes and streams. There are also in some lakes that do not empty into the ocean. These are known as landlocked salmon and sometimes called ouananiche. The landlocked salmon is the state fish of Maine. Generally taken from saltwater in the Atlantic from Maine to Labrador the Atlantic salmon goes to freshwater streams to spawn just like its pacific cousins. This fish does not need saltwater to survive. Although the Atlantic salmon is native to the Atlantic ocean is has recently been introduced to the Pacific Ocean and on both coasts it is very popular with sport fishing. Due to high demand commercial farming has become a big business. Commercial fishing for Atlantic salmon is almost non-existent. More than 95 percent of it found on the market has been raised in fish farms. Chili is one of the biggest suppliers of farm raised Atlantic salmon to the United States. The Atlantic salmon has a steel-blue back and silver sides with many dark, cross-shaped spots that have light blue halos. Also known as silver salmon, landlocked salmon, bay salmon, Sebago and Kennebec, it averages 10 pounds and 30 inches in length and has been known to reach 79 pounds. It has a firm, layered meat that is rich in flavor and very high in fat and remains moist after cooking. The best ways of cooking Atlantic salmon is to bake, broil, poach or grill.

SALMON, CHUM

The chum salmon is one of the larger members of the salmon family averaging 10 pounds and 3 feet in length and sometimes reaching up to 40 pounds. It has a metallic blue back with sparsely speckled sides and a silver belly. It is abundant north of Oregon in the Pacific Ocean and can be found in freshwater streams where it goes to spawn. The meat of the chum salmon has a light pink color and has less oil than the other types of salmon. The least prized of the salmon they are not as important commercially as other types of salmon. The chum salmon also goes by the names of calico, keta, lekai, hayo and dog salmon and is often marketed as silverbrite salmon. It has a firm layered flesh that is rich in flavor and relatively high in fat content and remains moist after cooking. The best ways to cook chum salmon is to bake, broil or poach.

Places to Stay in Atlantic City

If you’re looking for a great vacation spot, why not visit Atlantic City, located off the New Jersey shoreline, on Abescon island? The gorgeous seaside resort has a variety of luxury hotels to fit any lifestyle and budget. These high end hotels provide guests with all the essentials, plus the amenities we all enjoy.

The hotels in Atlantic-City provide guests with flexible pricing to stay competitive. The prices vary depending on the services and features they offer. The room size and the type of bed make a difference in determining the price. Standard, superior and suite rooms all have different rates.

Of course, how long you plan on staying also will affect the price you pay. Other factors include the time of year you visit Atlantic-City. During the winter, hotels on the beach advertise special discount rates. Usually hotel prices are higher during the summer, weekends or peak times.

Business travelers and government employees may be eligible for discount rates. Special groups and associations may also get discounts. There are even hotels that give cheaper rates for senior citizens.

Many of the hotels will also offer special rates if guests book their rooms through designated travel agents.

When you go to Atlantic-City you will find that room rates at luxurious hotels range from $120 to $350. They include the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, Hilton Casino Atlantic City Resort, and Skyline Tower Atlantic City.

If you’re more interested in a mid-priced hotel you can stay at any of the following; Sheraton Atlantic City Convention Center Hotel, Clarion Hotel and Convention Center, La Renaissance Suites, Trump Marina Hotel & Casino, and Holiday Inn Boardwalk. They will cost you from $60 to $200.

Those on a budget can stay at the Howard Johnson, Tropicana Casino & Hotel, Rodeway Inn South, and Quality Inn Atlantic City. These room rates are typically $40 to $60.

The room rates mentioned is per room per night. Each hotel reserves the right to alter their pricing without notice for whatever reason.

Atlantic City, an Early Tourism History

People know Atlantic City today as a gambling hotspot. But Atlantic City’s history is much more interesting than a simple slot machine. Atlantic City was incorporated in March of 1854, and that same year the first passenger railroad train made its way down the new line from Philadelphia. The total trip of about 60 miles took 2.5 hours, but by the trip’s end, as the first vacationers stepped off the train and onto the beach, the era of Atlantic City tourism had begun.

After 1860, Atlantic City became one of the hottest vacation destinations in America. Its primary draw – location – made it accessible from several major urban areas, particularly Philadelphia. People from all over would flock to the city’s beaches to enjoy summer activities. At the time, Atlantic City focused its energies on being a health resort. Doctors would even prescribe the city’s “sea air” as a remedy for stress, pain, and even insanity. As the population and tourism grew, the businesses began to expand and move closer to the beach.

There was only one problem with the close proximity to the beach – the beach itself. Merchants were inundated with sand dragged, dropped and deposited in their establishments. In the late 1860s, railroad constructor Andrew Boardman proposed a solution. Along with others, he suggested a walkway that would rise above the sand and allow beachgoers to clean their feet before leaving the beach. On June 26, 1870, the plan was realized – a wooden walkway was completed that separated the beach from the rest of the city. Boardman’s Walk – as it was called – was the world’s first. The name was eventually shortened to “Boardwalk”. Plus, as an official Atlantic City “street”, Boardwalk was (and still is) always spelled with a capital B.

As demand for additional beachfront space rose, the Boardwalk grew. This expansion led to the invention in 1884 of another Atlantic City staple, the rolling chair. A canopied chair designed to be pushed from behind, it made traveling the length of the ever-expanding Boardwalk easier for wealthy vacationers.

Boardwalk real estate became a prime location. All sorts of beachside attractions sprang up, from amusement piers to sideshows to performance theaters to small vendors selling Salt Water Taffy (another Atlantic City first) and more. Steeplechase Pier, Steel Pier, Heinz Pier, the Million Dollar Pier, and others made their glorious debuts in those first few decades of rapid development.

Between 1890 and 1940, Atlantic City’s history becomes less a single chain of events, but rather a series of “oddities” and “firsts.” So much happened in Atlantic City during its heyday: presidents came to speak, magicians dazzled audiences, amusement piers came and went and came again, and countless other bits and pieces of history were made. Atlantic City had razzle-dazzle, craziness, in-your-face showiness, corporate enterprising, and everything in between.

The first picture postcards in the U.S. were views of Atlantic City in 1872. Salt Water Taffy was invented and named there around 1880. The first air-conditioned theater opened in the summer of 1896. Although Chicago holds fame for the first “Ferris Wheel,” it was in 1891 that Williams Somers built an “observational roundabout” on the Boardwalk. It was this wheel ride that was observed and improved upon by George Washington Gale Ferris for the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, and it is his name, not Somers’, that is today attached to the ride.

The string of “firsts” continued into the 20th century. In 1915, the first non-subsidized public transportation system, The Atlantic City Jitney, was established. The first passenger airline service made its way through Atlantic City in 1919, the same year that the term “airport” was coined. Of course, the Miss America pageant started here in 1921, and continued here for decades. The first official convention hall opened its doors in Atlantic City in 1929. For golfers, the slang terms “Eagle” and “Birdie” were first used here.

By 1944, the Atlantic City Boardwalk stretched a staggering seven miles down the coast of Absecon Island – ending in Longport, three cities south. However, in the fall of that year, a massive east coast hurricane destroyed most of the Boardwalk, many attractions and several amusement piers. The Boardwalk would eventually be rebuilt to a shorter distance of about 5.75 miles (including the Ventnor section).

The hurricane of 1944 may have been the straw that broke the proverbial camel’s back for Atlantic City tourism. Commercial airline travel, popularized in the 1930s and 1940s, was making exotic destinations (such as Florida and the Bahamas) more accessible. There was less need for a local vacation destination, and Atlantic City tourism began its steady decline. By the 1960s, Atlantic City was all but dead. With almost no tourist income, high unemployment, and low population, something needed to be done.

In 1970, a bill was introduced to the New Jersey Assembly suggesting the legalization of gambling statewide as a way to boost Atlantic City’s economy. The bill was rejected and the idea dropped, partly due to pressure from protest groups against the idea of legalized gambling in New Jersey. At that point, the only state in the U.S. with legalized gambling was Nevada (established in the 1930s). Three similar gambling bills were brought to the assembly before it was finally approved in 1976, and only after the bill was modified to allow for gambling exclusively at Atlantic City, and not statewide as the previous proposals had suggested. A mere 18 months later, in May 1978, the first casino in Atlantic City – Resorts International – opened its doors. In the ensuing years, other casinos quickly followed suit, and a new wave of tourism began.